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The Blog of Drug Discovery News

Prince of Darkness and wife bring personal genomics issues to light

Last week, our senior editor, David Hutton, shared with you the news that rock star Ozzy Osbourne had his full genome sequence. Shortly after the Prince of Darkness revealed the results of his testing at the TEDMED conference in San Diego, his wife, Sharon Osbourne—a celebrity of her own right, between managing her husband’s career and her many television gigs—discussed the experience on her new talk show, “The Talk.”

“The Talk” is a daily talk/variety show co-hosted by Julie Chen, Sarah Gilbert, Holly Robinson Peete, Leah Remini and Marissa Jaret Winokur.

According to the Osbournes, the couple decided to allow Cofactor Genomics and Knome Inc. to sequence and analyze their DNA, respectively, because “they were looking for a celebrity to say, “OK, I don’t mind knowing what my medical life is going to be and I don’t mind sharing it with the world,” said Sharon to her co-hosts.

“Eventually—say, in 10 years, this invention will be in every doctor’s office, all over the world, where they take your blood, they analyze it, and they will tell you your complete medical path in life,” Sharon, who is a colon cancer survivor, said. “Everything, from your allergies, to your heart, to your brain, to how clever you are, to what you excel in. It’s such a leap, scientifically and medically, for all of us, that in 10 years, we’ll go into a doctor’s office and you’ll know if you have a cancer gene. You will know how to deal with it before it becomes an active cancer, or Alzheimer’s, or Parkinson’s.”

According to Sharon, among the insights Ozzy gained into his DNA were that he is allergic to coffee, has a “slight nerve disorder” as well as “the addictive gene” and is a” distant cousin” of TV talk show host and comedian Stephen Colbert. But Ozzy wasn’t exactly eager to hear the results, she said.

“He thought that it was, ‘where am I going to die,’ like someone was going to go to somebody and they were going to read his palm, like, ‘where am I going to go, so I never go into that place?'” Sharon said.

As David shared with you all last week, Ozzy has said that if genetic testing determines he has a risk of developing an untreatable disease such as Alzheimer’s, he’d rather not know about it. Ozzy’s tests came back negative in that regard, but Sharon is eagerly awaiting her results and hoping for the same outcome.

“The reasons I wanted to do it were because my father died of Alzheimer’s, and my mother’s mother died of Alzheimer’s, she said. “I want to know if I’m going to get it, so I can get my life in order.”

“I don’t know if I want to know,” said Sharon’s co-host, Peete, an actress and advocate for autism awareness and research. That’s the sentiment expressed by many folks since personal genetic testing became commercially available. We first reported on this debate in July 2009, when I interviewed 23andMe about a partnership the personal genomics company forged with PatientsLikeMe.com, an online patient community and platform for collecting and sharing patient data, on a large-scale genetic study of Parkinson’s disease. In an editorial column that month, I revealed that 23andMe was facing controversy because some view that patients may not be able to “handle” knowing more about their health, and that some doctors feel it’s not their responsibility to “explain” the outcome of these personal genetic tests to their patients.

In September, we also reported that some “direct-to-consumer” personal genetic testing providers are under federal scrutiny for alleged misleading test results, deceptive marketing and other questionable practices.

What about you? Do you want to know what sort of health problems your DNA has in store for you?

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November 7, 2010 - Posted by | Labwork & Science | , , , , , , , , ,

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