ddn Online

The Blog of Drug Discovery News

Alzheimer’s prevention: A call to arms

As our managing editor, Jeffrey Bouley, discussed last week, in our November issue we detail one group’s effort to develop to “launch the era of Alzheimer’s disease prevention research”—before another generation of patients is lost (see “An ounce of prevention”).

That effort, the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative, is a project launched by the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, a nonprofit, collaborative research center in Phoenix.

Led by reknowned Alzheimer’s researchers Drs. Eric Reiman and Pierre Tariot, the API aims to test potential Alzheimer’s treatments and identify new biomarkers that could lead to earlier and more accurate diagnoses for Alzheimer’s patients.

Reiman and Tariot have been carrying the torch for Alzheimer’s disease prevention for many years. In the course of reporting on their work, Reiman shared with me an article they penned this year with colleague Jessica Langbaum that they consider “a call to arms.” The article, “Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative: a proposal to evaluate presymptomatic treatments as quickly as possible,” was published in the Future Medicine journal, Biomarkers in Medicine.

The article contends that the evaluation of presymptomatic Alzheimer’s treatments must become an urgent priority, identifies what is holding us back and proposes new public policies and scientific strategies to overcome these roadblocks.

Here’s an excerpt from the piece:

“Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an unacceptable problem. It takes a catastrophic toll on patients and family caregivers, and it is projected to have a financially overwhelming effect around the world in our children’s lifetime. In our opinion, the greatest roadblock in the scientific fight against AD is not necessarily the discovery of new treatments, but the means to evaluate them presymptomatically, when they may have their greatest impact, in a sufficiently rapid and rigorous way. It currently takes too many cognitively normal research subjects, too many years and too much money to evaluate more than a few presymptomatic AD treatments using clinical end points. Brain imaging and other biomarkers of AD progression and pathology have the potential to accelerate the evaluation of presymptomatic AD treatments. However, regulatory agencies are unlikely to provide accelerated approval for a presymptomatic AD treatment based solely on biomarker end points, without additional evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to conclude that a treatment’s biomarker effects are reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit. In the meantime, sponsors are reluctant to conduct presymptomatic AD trials without a regulatory approval pathway. This dilemma may at first seem like an insurmountable ‘catch-22,’ leading to a sense of nihilism and a lack of urgency, but inaction is not an option.”

The article makes a compelling case for a sea change in the way scientists, researchers and pharmaceutical companies approach treating this devastating disease. To view the entire piece, please click here to download this PDF file: Reiman.

Advertisements

October 21, 2010 - Posted by | Academia & Non-Profit | , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by DDNOnline, DDNOnline. DDNOnline said: An Alzheimer's disease "call to arms"…ddn Chief Editor Amy Swinderman discusses more about it at the blog: http://wp.me/pT4xT-3D […]

    Pingback by Tweets that mention Alzheimer’s prevention: A call to arms « ddn Online -- Topsy.com | October 22, 2010 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: